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Fate of 19-year-old-Black Cleveland area woman accused of shooting a Cleveland police officer to death is in the hands of jurors.....Tamara McLoyd is accused of shooting Cleveland police officer Shane Bartek to death on New Years Eve in 2021

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Pictured are nineteen-year-old Tamara McLoyd (left) and 25-year-old Cleveland police officer Shane Bartek (right), whom she is accused of shooting to death on New Year's Eve in 2021.

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor-in-chief

CLEVELAND, Ohio - The fate of a 19-year old Black Cleveland area woman charged in connection with the 2021 New Year's Eve carjacking and shooting death of off duty Cleveland police officer Shane Bartek in the Kamms Corner neighborhood on the city's largely White west side is in the hands of jurors, who will begin deliberating on Wednesday.

Tamara McLoyd, of Garfield Heights, faced several charges relative to the officer's shooting death, including aggravated murder, aggravated robbery, felonious assault, grand theft, and having weapons under disability. She did not take the stand and testify at her own trial.

Her attorneys told the jury that she was drunk and high when the incident happened. She could spend 20 years to life in prison if convicted.

McLoyd’s defense team says the state hasn’t proven its case while the prosecution says McLoyd admitted in her interrogation that she robbed and then shot and killed  Bartek.

Bartek's mother, grandmother and twin sister watched from the overflow room along with a cadre of Cleveland police officers as the celebrated case was handed to jurors for deliberation.

Though Officer Bartek, 25 at the time of his death, was off-duty when he was killed, Cleveland Mayor Justin Bibb deemed his killing that of an on-duty cop in order that the fallen officer's family could qualify for benefits, including funeral and burial monies.

McLoyd  was on probation and under the supervision of the Lorain County Juvenile Court for a robbery conviction when she allegedly shot and killed Bartek.  Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Mike O'Malley told reporters that at that time McLoyd had been convicted of robbery as a juvenile in Lorain County Juvenile Court and that she should not have been on the streets, though a judge who had released her from custody obviously disagreed with his stance.

Officer Bartek was shot twice in the back in his car, which was parked outside of his apartment complex. He was pronounced dead after being transported by EMS from the scene of the shooting to Fairview Hospital.

Surveillance video purportedly reveals that McLoyd drove off in the officer's personal car after she allegedly shot him. She ultimately delivered the car to Anthony Butler Jr, 28 and of Bedford Heights, the other suspect who was charged with fleeing and receiving stolen property. Butler has pleaded not guilty

Police recovered the stolen car following a high speed chase through the city and several other communities.

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Thursday, 04 August 2022 14:37

Women's March Cleveland to march August 2,2022/Armond Budish to propose legislation to Cuyahoga County Council on this date in support of reproductive rights for women....The march will also address anti-abortion Ohio House Bill 704,...By Clevelandurbann

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Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com

WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND TO RALLY AND MARCH ON TUES, AUG 2, 2022 OUTSIDE OF THE CUYAHOGA COUNTY COUNCIL MEETING IN DOWNTOWN CLEVELAND AGAINST REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS AND AGAINST HOUSE BILL 704

CLEVELAND, Ohio-This event has been rescheduled to Aug 2 because Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish advised that he would be submitting his women's rights proposal to county council on Aug 2 rather than the previous date that we were given. Women's March Cleveland (216-659-0473) will rally beginning at 5:00pm and later speak at the Cuyahoga County Council meeting in downtown Cleveland at 2079 E 9th St on Tue, Aug 2, 2022 to support County Executive Armond Budish' proposal to county council for abortion access and resources and public policy changes for women in Cuyahoga County. A march will follow. We urge county council to approve the proposal This will be a mass event with a march at 5:45pm

Led by Women's March Cleveland Mr Budish recently met with activists and other women;s advocacy leaders of greater Cleveland to dicuss his proposal and to take recommendations.The meeting was productive.

Also at issue is Ohio House Bill 704, which was recently introduced by Republican lawmakers in Ohio. If it becomes state law it will ban abortion outright in Ohio unless the mother's life is at risk. The heartbeat bill, a state law that took effect after Roe v Wade was overturned last month, bans abortion in Ohio after a fetal heartbeat, which Republicans who championed the new law say occurs at roughly six weeks of pregnancy Democrats say the time in shorter Nonetheless, it is an unconstitutional invasion of women's privacy.
Roe v Wade was overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court on June 24 and women will fight back We rallied at the last county council meeting where Mr Budish unleashed his proposal that he said he will introduce at the August 2 county council meeting. Hence, we shall be there in full force and in support of the initiative. The county executive's prospective proposal for county council to vote upon comes behind the U.S. Supreme Court's June 24, 2022 overturning of Roe v Wade and includes the following points:
...Benefits to county employees allowing them access to reproductive health care services, including abortion care. This benefit would assist with transportation, lodging, and related costs. The County would provide this benefit with the utmost focus on protecting the privacy of employees.
...Financial grants to local and state organizations providing similar health care services to residents, allowing them to access services as needed.
...Financial grants to support local organizations that provide education regarding reproductive health care options, which include abortion care. (These organizations may need additional support to supply these vital education services due to a potential increase in demand),
...Reproductive health initiatives, including a nondiscrimination ordinance that prohibits discrimination, termination, or other loss of public accommodation because of a reproductive health decision.
Women's March Cleveland thanks County Executive Armond Budish as to the aforementioned Our bodies, our choice!!!!
Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 02 August 2022 14:34

Registration extended for City of Cleveland curbside recycling program, Mayor Justin Bibb announces...."We have extended the sign-up deadline to get as many households enrolled as possible," said Mayor Bibb. "I hope residents will join us in this effort

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Pictured is Cleveland Matyor Justin Bibb

Saturday, July 30, 2022 CLEVELAND, Ohio The City of Cleveland is extending the open enrollment period to sign up for the curbside recycling program. Residents can register for the program by visiting CLErecycles.com or by calling (216) 664-3030.

Recyclables must be placed in blue bins that are properly labeled with recycling stickers. Enrolled households will receive stickers and instructions in the mail along with a recycling program welcome packet. Pictured is Cleveland Matyor Justin Bibb


Properly labeled blue bins with enrollment stickers on the top and sides will be picked up as recycling by City of Cleveland crews on residents' regular trash collection day. Unlabeled blue bins will continue to be collected as trash.


"We have extended the sign-up deadline to get as many households enrolled as possible," said Mayor Justin M. Bibb, a change agent mayor who took office in January. "I hope residents will join us in this effort to reduce landfill waste."


No further action is needed from the 42,000 households enrolled in the program to date. Welcome packets and enrollment stickers have been delivered or are currently in the mail for all households enrolled on or before July 23, 2022.


What is the difference between trash and recycling? Trash refers to the material that is thrown away as worthless. Recycling programs help weed out potentially useful items that may have once been considered trash to turn in to useful products. Recycling is designed to conserve energy, reduce air and water pollution, reduce landfill waste and greenhouse gases, and conserve natural resources.


In the first month of the program, the City of Cleveland recycled 167 tons of material—enough to fill 14 semi-trailers. These materials stay local and are quickly turned into new products—aluminum cans within 60 days; glass bottles within 30 days; and cardboard boxes within two weeks.


Thanks to the diligence of residents enrolled in the program, the rate of contamination in the city's recycling has been very low. This bodes well for the future success of Cleveland's recycling program.


For the list of acceptable materials and City of Cleveland recycling FAQs visit the Sustainable Cleveland recycling page at sustainablecleveland.org/recycling.


Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.



Last Updated on Sunday, 31 July 2022 07:32

Last 2 ex-cops sentenced in George Floyd's death get prison.....Remembering Cleveland's George Floyd riot....By editor Kathy Wray Coleman of Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's Black digital news leader

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Pictured are George Thao and J. Alexander Kueng Floyd and ex Minneapolis

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com Tho

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor-in-chief

ST. Paul, Minnesota- The final two of four former Minneapolis police officers convicted earlier this year on federal criminal charges regarding the 2020 fatal arrest of unarmed Black man George Floyd are headed to prison.

J. Alexander Kueng, 28, the lone Black among the four ex police officers accused of violating Floyd's civil rights, and Tou Thao, 36, both convicted in February, were sentenced to three years and three and a half years in prison, respectively, on Wednesday by federal court Judge Paul A. Magnuson. This means that all four of the officers who helped restrain Floyd the day of his untimely death on May 25, 2020 have been sentenced to prison time.

Kueng held down Floyd's torso whikle ex officer Derk Chauvin kneeled on his neck until he died, and Thao kept bystanders at bay. Neither Kueng nor Thao spoke at sentencing, though their attorneys sent a letter to the court before sentencing saying their clients have been "born again" since the George Floyd incident

Thomas Lane, 39, who held down Floyd's legs, was convicted by the same jury of one federal charge and was sentenced last week to two and a half years in prison by Judge Magnuson, and Chauvin, Floyd's direct killer, pleaded guilty to violating Floyd's civil rights and was sentenced earler this month to 21 years in prison to be served concurrently with his 22.5-year sentence on murder charges brought by the state of Minnesota.
The major culprit relative to George Floyd's murder, Chauvin kneeled on Floyd's neck for more than nine minutes when he was killing him as Floyd begged for mercy and called out for his deceased "mamma."

Floyd, 46, left behind two children. His unprecedented death at the hands of police capitivated America and drew nationwide protests and racial unrest.

Floyd's family members did not attend Wednesday's sentencing  of Kueng and Thao, a scenario that differed in comparison to Chauvin's sentencing in July of 2021 by federal district court Judge Peter Cahill on convictions relative to second and third degree murder charges brought on behalf of the state of Minnesota.

They also gathered when Chauvin was convicted in April of 2021 of killing Floyd, his family members and Civil Rights and Black Lives Matter activists, including the Rev. Al Sharpton, gathering for a rally in front of the courthouse in downtown Minneapolis after the Chauvin verdict was read, some carrying signs with pictures of Floyd, Philando Castile, Breonna Taylor, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice and other Black men and women killed in encounters with police

Also on that day, Floyd's younger brother Philonise Floyd, and other family members, including Floyd's daughter, flanked by the Rev Al Sharpton, the Rev Jesse Jackson, and Floyd family attorneys dedicated the jury verdict in his brother's murder case to the legacy of Emmett Till, whom White supremacists hanged and murdered in 1955, and with impunity.

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland said in a statement after Chauvin's convictions last April that the justice department’s federal civil rights investigation into the death of George Floyd “is ongoing." And Minnesota Gov Tim Waltz said that "it's an important step towards justice for Minnesota, trial’s over, but here in Minnesota, I want to be very clear, we know our work just begins."

Both President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris, the nation's first Black vice president and a former prosecutor and state attorney general, spoke out after the verdict last year in the celebrated murder case, Harris calling it justice delivered and Biden saying that "no one should be above the law and today's verdict sends that message."

Vice President Harris said that the pain in the Black community relative to the police murder of George Floyd and so many other Blacks like him still lingers.

"Today we feel a sigh of relief," said Vice President Harris during a press conference after the guilty verdict last year in the state's case. "Still it cannot take away the pain."

The vice president said that "a measure of justice isn't the same as equal justice."

Even the national president of Chauvin's police union celebrated Chauvins convictions in April in what he called the case of a cop gone bad, a case where even the disgraced former police officer's peers and supervisors became key witnesses for the prosecution at trial, a trial that legal experts said was won from the beginning with a video of the entire incident taken by a by-standard.

"We were one of the first organization's to step forward and say this just doesn't look right." said Patrick Yoes, national president of the Fraternal Order of Police.

The city has settled a wrongful death lawsuit with Floyd's family for $27 million, the largest of its kind in U.S. history.

Arrested on a forgery charge over a $20 bill, Floyd pleaded for his life and cried out that he could not breathe when Chauvin murdered him by hoding his knee on his neck before an astonished crowd of people, some in the crowd hollering for him to ease up on his excessive force against Floyd, but to no avail.

Floyd was pronounced dead an hour later at an area hospital

Protests in Minneapolis ensued and spread to over 2,000 cities and towns in all 50 states, and riots subsequently broke out in Minneapolis and in cities nationwide, including in Cleveland, Ohio.
Black Lives Matter activists led Cleveland's protest on May 30, 2020 where anxious and angry protesters rioted and tore up  downtown Cleveland, destroying businesses and writing graphite on landmark buildings. Protesters, mainly young people, also set Cleveland police cruisers on fire.

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

 

Last Updated on Sunday, 31 July 2022 07:33

City of Cleveland seeks applicants for Civilian Police Review Board with the application deadline August 26...CPRB members are paid $8,963 annually

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Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

 

CLEVELAND, Ohio — The City of Cleveland, which is led by new Mayor Justin Bibb, the city's fourth Black mayor who took office in January, is looking for qualified applicants to fill three seats on the nine-member Civilian Police Review Board with the application deadline set for Aug 26. Candidates for these positions must be residents of the City of Cleveland at the time of the appointment. Selected applicants will be appointed to one of the following four-year terms:

  • One position's term lasts from Dec. 21, 2021, to Dec 20, 2025. The individual appointed to this term would also be eligible to apply for the new full four-year term that would begin Dec. 21, 2025.

  • Two positions' terms last from Aug. 9, 2022, to Aug. 8, 2026.

The compensation for CPRB members is $8,963 annually. To apply, submit a resume with work history and a cover letter to Ryan Puente, chief government affairs officer for the city, at rpuente@clevelandohio.gov by Fri, Aug. 26

The Civilian Police Review Board (CPRB) was established per the city charter and is governed by the mayor and city council. The mayor appoints five members and the city council, led  by council president Blaine Griffin, appoints the remaining four members. It has the power to review police misconduct complaints and recommend an investigation to the Office of Professional Standards (OPS) when such alleged misconduct is directed toward any person who is not a CDP employee.

The OPS reports directly to the CPRB, and the CPRB reviews the investigations completed by the OPS, holds  public hearings on the complaints, and then recommends an administrative resolution for each of the complaints.

City officials said Tuesday in a press release that applicants are encouraged to review City of Cleveland Charter Section 115, which governs the CPRB and OPS, and which was significantly reformed following the passage of police reform Issue 24 in 2021 by Cleveland voters. Issue 24 created a community review commission to oversee CPRB, though pursuant to state law, police union collective agreements remain applicable regarding ultimate discipline and other terms of employment with the city.

Whether parts of Issue 24 conflict with the police collective bargaining agreement remains to be seen, and if so, the issue will likely be determined by a court of competent jurisdiction, if properly challenged by the union that has standing to pursue the issue.

Requirements: Persons applying to fill a position on the CPRB cannot be employed currently as a law enforcement officer and cannot be a current or former employee of the Cleveland Division of Police. Also, such persons cannot be currently employed by the City of Cleveland or by any public agency having a connection with the City of Cleveland, including county agencies and community development corporations.

The city now requires that two members of the CPRB "should be attorneys with experience representing victims of police misconduct or criminally prosecuting police misconduct." Preference will be given to candidates who meet that description, city officials have said.


The city remains a party to a court-monitored consent decree for police reforms with the U.S. Department of Justice that was instituted in 2014 behind high profile police shooting deaths of Black people since 2012, including the "137 shots" police shooting of Malissa Williams and Timothy Russel in 2012 and 12-year-old Tamir Rice in 2014, not to mention rapper Kenneth "Ball" Smith, Brandon Jones and a string of others.

 

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.


Last Updated on Sunday, 31 July 2022 07:34

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Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.


Last Updated on Sunday, 31 July 2022 07:34

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The annual11th Congressional District Caucus Parade is Monday, September 2

11th Congressional District Congresswoman Marcia L. Fudge, a Warrensville Heights Democrat who also chairs the Congressional Black Caucus of Blacks in Congress. waives to the crowd last year at the annual 11th Congressional District Caucus Parade.  This year's parade kicks off on Monday, September 2 on Cleveland's east side at 10:00 am from E. 149th Street and Kinsman Road and ends at Luke Easter Park where the picnic will begin. The event will be replete with political speeches and entertainment from various sources, including local musicians and bands. The well-attended caucus parade was initiated by Democrat Louis Stokes, the retired congressman before Fudge, and the tradition was furthered by the late Democratic Congresswoman Stephanie Tubbs Jones, Fudges' predecessor. Stokes was the first Black congressperson from Ohio and Tubbs Jones was the first Black congresswoman from Ohio