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CNN reports that Liz Cheney vows to carry on fight against Trump after conceding defeat in Wyoming primary and losing her U.S. House of Representatives seat to a Trump-backed Republican

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(CNN)Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney, the most ardent Republican critic of Donald Trump in Congress, vowed to carry on her fight against the former President and the election-denying movement he leads in a speech Tuesday night after conceding defeat in her primary.

She'll lose to Trump-backed attorney Harriet HagemanCNN reported.
"This primary election is over," Cheney said in her speech. "But now the real work begins." CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE AT CNN.COM
Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 17 August 2022 15:29

East Cleveland Mayor Brandon King facing recall effort in November, East Cleveland an impoverished Black suburb of Cleveland....By Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's Black digital news leader

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Pictured is East Cleveland Mayor Brandon King

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com

EAST CLEVELAND, Ohio-East Cleveland Mayor Brandon King is facing a recall effort after the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections on Thursday certified 322 valid petition signatures,11 more than the 311 needed to put the issue before voters, likely for the Nov 8 general election.

Per the city charter, the Black mayor has until Aug. 18 to resign or face a recall vote in November. If the recall is successful Council President Nathaniel Martin will step up as mayor until a runoff election can be held in early 2023.

Governed by a mayor and city council, East Cleveland is a 99 percent Black and impoverished suburb of Cleveland. It has a population of some 14,000 people and 59 percent of household income is less than $25,000. It is one of the poorest cities in Ohio with a majority of its residents living below the poverty line. Its mayor and members of city council are all Democrats

The city has been under fiscal emergency for the last decade.

William Fambrough, who supported Councilwoman Juanita Gowdy in her unsuccessful effort to unseat King via last year's primary election is spearheading the recall effort as a member of a citizens group that says King has permitted police to abuse their power and that he and police are undermining city council's authority.The mayor is also accused of misappropriating city monies and retaliating against his political rivals with malicious prosecutions at the hands of city law director Willa Simmons.

Then the vice president of city council, King succeeded former mayor Gary Norton into office in December of 2016 by succession, and after East Cleveland voters recalled Norton and the council president, that effort organized by activists who complained that Norton was fiscally irresponsible and was supporting a now defunct merger proposal with East Cleveland and neighboring Cleveland King has since won election in 2017 and reelction 2021.

Mayor King, 54, was born and raised in East Cleveland, and he holds an MBA from the Ohio State University.

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.


Last Updated on Wednesday, 17 August 2022 15:14

At Mayor Justin Bibb's insistence, Cleveland City Council passes anti-eviction ordinance co-sponsored by Councilwoman Maurer that precludes eviction if back rent and late fees are paid

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Pictured are Cleveland Mayor Justin Bibb and Ward 12 Councilwoman Rebecca Maurer

CLEVELAND, Ohio— Cleveland City Council at its regular meeting on Wednesday unanimously passed a Pay to Stay ordinance that gives housing renters in the city more rights and more stability.


Under Pay to Stay, if a tenant is summoned to court for an eviction for non-payment of rent, he or she can stop the proceeding if the full amount of rent owed is paid, plus any late fees. Previously landlords could secure evictions for non-payment of rent after an eviction filing in Cleveland Municipal Housing Court, even if the tenant comes up with the money owed during the eviction proceeding.
Housing evictions for other justifiable reasons are not impacted.
Under Ohio law, a tenant can be evicted for being just one day late or one dollar short on rent and Ohio is one of a handful of states that allows a tenant to be evicted in such a manner, though other legal requirements such as proper notice and non-discriminatory actions must also be followed. The city's new ordinance would override the mandate for eviction for being "a day late and a dollar short," the city's mayor said in a press release on Wednesday after the city council, led by Council President Blaine Griffin, passed the precedent setting ordinance.
"Today, we took a big step toward housing justice and promoting equity in the City of Cleveland," said Mayor Justin M. Bibb, who took office in January and was behind pushing the city council to adopt the ordinance. "And we won't stop here. I am grateful to our director of building and housing, Sally Martin, city council, and all the community partners for their diligence and hard work on this critical legislation."
Martin said that Ohio is not doing enough to protest tenants rights statewide.
"Simply put, the state should be better protecting tenants but that is not happening in Ohio," said Martin. "This is common sense protection for renters in the City of Cleveland and we are thrilled to see it cross the finish line."

City Council is becoming more progressive on housing issues as its membership changes and young new council persons are getting elected,
"This is another layer that we can use to support our residents and protect their housing.'' said Ward 12 Councilwoman Rebecca Maurer, a licensed attorneyand co-sponsor of the legislation and a westside councilwoman who won office last year by upsetting longtime councilman Anthony Brancatelli. "We are working closely with the Legal Aid Society, Northeast Ohio Coalition for the Homeless and others to ensure that the education component of this ordinance happens and that renters know this defense is available to them."
Cleveland Municipal Housing Court Judge W. Mona' Scott, whose housing court is part of Cleveland Municipal Court but operates independently of it as to its budget, personnel, and some other matters, could not be reached for comment. Judge Scott is Black, and so are Councilman Griffin and Mayor Bibb, 35.
Pay to Stay provides a pathway for tenants who tender late rent to stay in their homes and is a tangible policy tool that protects renters, the mayor say, particularly those disproportionately impacted by evictions, homelessness, and entrenched structural and economic inequities.
As one the poorest big cities in America by some standards, Cleveland is facing an eviction crisis, which has been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. According to an Eviction Study undertaken by the city, some 9,000 evictions are filed each year about 80 percent of them are for non-payment of rent. And in most cases tenants missed one or two rent payments, the study says.
The mayor said Wednesday that his office will be partnering with city council and organizations across the city to launch an education campaign to ensure both tenants and landlords understand the ordinance, their rights, and how to navigate the process.

Advocates for the homeless say Cleveland's eviction process is troublesome at best
"Not only are evictions a leading cause of homelessness, but studies show that children changing schools as a result of eviction experience declines in educational achievement," said Molly Martin, Director of Strategic Initiatives at Northeast Ohio Coalition for the Homeless. "This ordinance is an important step to ensure fairness in the eviction process and to call for more rights that will protect renters in our community."
The Black community, and not just westsiders and area anti-homeless organizations led by Whites, should be at the table relative to any outreach initiatives around the ordinance, Black Cleveland activists have said.

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.


Last Updated on Tuesday, 16 August 2022 15:48

Democrat Nancy Pelosi comments on the FBI raid of Trump's Mar-a-Lago home in Palm Beach as do several Republican allies of the former president, including U.S. Rep Jim Jordan of Ohio....By editor Kathy Wray Coleman iof Clevelandurbannews.com

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Pictured are former United States president Donald Trump and current Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor-in-chief

PALM BEACH, Florida- The FBI raided former president Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort residence in Palm Beach, Florida on Monday seeking classified documents and evidence of wrongdoing during his presidency, the raid the result of the execution of a search warrant that has the former president's Republican allies in an upheaval and media across the country in a frenzy.

It is the first time in American history that a search warrant has been executed against a former president and it was issued on the anniversary date of Richard Nixon’s Aug 4, 1974 resignation, which followed the Watergate scandal.

Democrats in Washington are elated as they renew the push for the Justice Department to bring criminal charges against the former president, a real estate mogul and former television personality who twice survived impeachment proceedings and was ousted in 2020 by now president Joe Biden, a  Democrat who was vice president under former president Barack Obama, a two-term president and the nation's first Black president.

"To have a warrant, you need justification. And that says that no one is above the law, not even a president or a former president of the United States," House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., told MSNBC's "Morning Joe."

Pelosi said that the government raid on Trump's home is a step in the right direction.

"We believe in the rule of law. That's what our country is about," Pelosi said in an interview with NBC's "Today" show.

The now infamous FBI raid on Trump's elaborate Florida compound comes during speculation that he intends to announce shortly that he will run for president in 2024 It also comes hardly two weeks after the Jan. 6 committee that is investigating the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol recessed until next month.

Trump, however, was not at home at his resort in Florida and was at Trump Tower in New York City when the raid occurred. He said that it is nothing more than a witch hunt and released a statement saying that he too is shocked at the actions undertaken by the FBI and the Justice Department under U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland..

"My beautiful home, Mar-A-Lago in Palm Beach, Florida, is currently under siege, raided, and occupied by a large group of FBI agents," Trump said in a statement Monday evening.

The former president owns the 650,000 square feet resort and also has a mansion on the multi-million dollar property, a place he sometimes retreated to with his family when he was president and home to some 29 other billionaires.

Trump's lawyers had been in negotiations with government officials over the classified documents, or what the federal government says are classified documents. Those documents were the target of the raid, sources said, a raid that left Trump's home office and bedroom in disarray.

Valued By Forbes Magazine at $160 million in 2018, Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate is, no doubt, beautiful, and it is the second largest mansion in the state of Florida.

Congressional and Senate Republicans lined up against the FBI raid and in support of the former president as the midterm elections near and the battle for control of the House of Representatives and U.S.Senate looms on.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., tweeted  that  "I've seen enough,"  and controversial U.S. Rep Marjorie Greene of Georgia, Sen Marco Rubio of Florida, and Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio were among Republicans who joined McCarthy in expressing dismay, Jordan saying in a statement that "this is what happens in third world countries."

A senior member of the U.S. Senate Sen Lindsey Grahamlled the raid on the former president problematic and said that "nobody is above the law." He said also that he believes it was unnecessary

This is a developing story.

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Monday, 15 August 2022 00:15

CDC to recommend COVID-19 guidelines for K-12 schools....By editor Kathy Wray Coleman of Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's Black digital news leader

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By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor-in-chief

WASHINGTON, D.C.-As the nation's K-12 students head back to the classroom, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is issuing COVID-19 recommendations for K-12 schools.

The CDC is expected to make its recommendations official in coming days, Washington insiders have said. This includes minimizing both the "test to stay" requirement in which students exposed to COVID-19 take regular tests to stay in the classroom and the measures put in for social distancing, which is currently being phased out altogether.

CDC COVID-19 recommendations regarding travel, churches, nursing homes and other similarly affected venues are also  expected to come later this month.

What exactly is the CDC? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is the national public health agency of the United States. It is a fecderal agency under the purview of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which is led by Department of Health and Services Secretary Xavier Becerra.

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Saturday, 06 August 2022 16:53

Ninteen-year-old Black woman is convicted of killing a Cleveland cop on New Years Eve with Judge John O'Donnell set to sentence her.... Tamara McLoyd will besentneced later this month for killing Cleveland police officer Shane Bartek, 25

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Pictured are 19-year-old Tanara McLoyd and Cleveland police officer Shane Bartek, 25

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor-in-chief

CLEVELAND, Ohio - A 19-year old Black Cleveland area woman charged in connection with the 2021 New Year's Eve carjacking and shooting death of off-duty Cleveland police officer Shane Bartek in the Kamms Corner neighborhood on the city's largely White west side was convicted on Wednesday by a Cuyahoga County common pleas jury.

Tamara McLoyd, of Garfield Heights, faced several charges relative to the officer's shooting death, including aggravated murder, aggravated robbery, felonious assault, grand theft, and having weapons under disability. She did not take the stand and testify at her own trial.

Jurors deliberated for some four hours before reaching a verdict. Controversial common pleas Judge John O'Donnell, who presided over the trial, set sentencing for Sept 27 and she could spend 20 years to life in prison, depending on what sentence the judge imposes.

An appeal is likely, sources said.

McLoyd's attorneys told the jury during trial that McLoyd was drunk and high when the incident happened.

Her defense team argued that the state had not proven its case while the prosecution said McLoyd admitted in her interrogation that she robbed and then shot and killed  Bartek.  The jury sided with the prosecution.

Bartek's mother, grandmother and twin sister watched from the overflow room along with a cadre of Cleveland police officers as the celebrated case was handed to jurors for deliberation and were there when the verdict was read

Though Officer Bartek, 25 at the time of his death, was off-duty when he was killed, Cleveland Mayor Justin Bibb deemed his killing that of an on-duty cop in order that the fallen officer's family could qualify for benefits, including funeral and burial monies.

McLoyd  was on probation and under the supervision of the Lorain County Juvenile Court for a robbery conviction when she allegedly shot and killed Bartek.  Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Mike O'Malley told reporters that at that time McLoyd had been convicted of robbery as a juvenile in Lorain County Juvenile Court and that she should not have been on the streets, though a judge who had released her from custody obviously disagreed with his stance.


Others question how McLoyd, at such a young age, fail so quickly into the cracks of crime with little to no help of rehibilation. But some critics are not so lenient and are hoping for the judge to throw the book at the young woman since the person she killed was a cop, and cops in America are privileged, particularly where Blacks are concerned.

Officer Bartek was shot twice in the back in his car as she robbed him, his car parked outside of the apartment complex where he lived. He was pronounced dead after being transported by EMS from the scene of the shooting to Fairview Hospital.

Surveillance video purportedly reveals that McLoyd drove off in the officer's personal car after she allegedly shot him. She ultimately delivered the car to Anthony Butler Jr, 28 and of Bedford Heights, the other suspect who was charged with fleeing and receiving stolen property. Butler has pleaded not guilty

Police recovered the stolen car following a high speed chase through the city and several other communities.

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 09 August 2022 13:53

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The annual11th Congressional District Caucus Parade is Monday, September 2

11th Congressional District Congresswoman Marcia L. Fudge, a Warrensville Heights Democrat who also chairs the Congressional Black Caucus of Blacks in Congress. waives to the crowd last year at the annual 11th Congressional District Caucus Parade.  This year's parade kicks off on Monday, September 2 on Cleveland's east side at 10:00 am from E. 149th Street and Kinsman Road and ends at Luke Easter Park where the picnic will begin. The event will be replete with political speeches and entertainment from various sources, including local musicians and bands. The well-attended caucus parade was initiated by Democrat Louis Stokes, the retired congressman before Fudge, and the tradition was furthered by the late Democratic Congresswoman Stephanie Tubbs Jones, Fudges' predecessor. Stokes was the first Black congressperson from Ohio and Tubbs Jones was the first Black congresswoman from Ohio