Screen

Profile

Layout

Direction

Menu Style

Cpanel

Cleveland police, Cuyahoga County sheriff's deputies and Ohio Highway Patrol cops perform felony arrests of some 15 Black male dirt bike riders in Cleveland in one day via Operation ‘Wheels Down,' which some Blacks say is racist, and without warning

E-mail Print PDF

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor-in-chief

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

CLEVELAND, Ohio-Cleveland police, in cooperation with the Cuyahoga County Sheriff's Office and the Ohio Highway Patrol, arrested more than a dozen Black men over the weekend who ride their dirt bikes in Cleveland off the roads, arrests pursuant to a sting operation dubbed "Wheels Down," and with no prior warning since the practice of dirt bike riding, whether lawful or unlawful, went on routinely under former Cleveland mayor Frank Jackson, the city's four term Black mayor. And county and state law enforcement officials also went along with the free-for-all practice of dirt bike riding in Cleveland without legal consequences, one that is under attack now in almost what comes off, say sources, as advertising by city, county and state officials for a hard-on-crime approach with young, Black men and boys as pawns.

The heightened arrests of Black, male dirt bike riders in Cleveland comes during a political season, Ohio a pivotal state and Cleveland a pivotal city.

According to police records,15 of the arrests resulted in felony arrests on Sat, May 21, and 30 citations were issued coupled with the confiscation of 15 vehicles. Also, two firearms were seized during Saturday's dirt bike sting operation in Cleveland, police said, and two of the confiscated vehicles had allegedly been stolen. Current fines run between $50 and $100 for driving an unregistered dirt bike in Cleveland and a first offense is a second degree misdemeanor, though city council is expected to  approve heightened penalties and fines at its regular council meeting Monday evening. A proposed new ordinance would boost the fine to $1,000 and the penalty for a first offense to a first degree misdemeanor.

Community activists say they object to heightened criminal penalties and fines for dirt bike riders and that increasing a first offense from a first degree misdemeanor to a second degree misdemeanor is problematic as first degree misdemeanors of such type are harder to get expunged.

Jackson retired last year as mayor and was succeeded by current Mayor Justin Bibb, 34 and Cleveland's fourth Black mayor. Bibb must work with the 17- member, all Democratic Cleveland City Council and its new president, Blaine Griffin, to be effective, Griffin a Black east side councilman representing Ward 6 and Jackson's protege who once was director of the city's community relations board.

Governed by outgoing Democratic Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish and an 11-member bipartisan county council, Cuyahoga County includes Cleveland, a largely Black major American city. It is a roughly 29 percent Black county and a Democratic stronghold, and is the second largest of Ohio's 88 counties, behind the heavily Democratic Franklin County, which includes the capital city of Columbus.

The crack down on what city, county and state law enforcement officials say is against crime during a gubernatorial election year has been labeled "Wheels Down," a law enforcement sting aimed at stopping illegal off-road vehicle activity in the city that is quickly being branded racist by Black leaders, many of whom wanted to remain anonymous for this article for fear of reprisal. One Cleveland council person called the activity "open season on Black people in Cleveland by top level White law enforcement figures from across the state that puts the safety and freedom of Black children at risk."

Some residents and west side councilpersons in particular complained repeatedly during Jackson's last term of the problem with the city's dirt bike riders and requested his intervention. But the then mayor, a city council president-turned mayor, did little in response and, instead, unsuccessfully sought an ordinance to build a dirt bike track.

Jackson's grandson Frank Q Jackson, who was shot and killed in September of 2021 at 24-years-old, and while he was mayor, was an avid dirt bike rider.

Some Black leaders say the obsession with the Black dirt bikers in Cleveland is racist and that sudden felony arrests in droves of young Black men by the city's overwhelming White police department, aided by a largely White county sheriff's office and majority White state highway patrol officers, is not the answer. Others say that operation "Wheels Down" went forward without any true community dialogue or input, particularly from Cleveland's Black community since Blacks are largely the target of the sting. Critics also say that it is politically motivated as Ohio Gov Mike DeWine, a GOP incumbent, faces Democrat and former Dayton mayor Nan Whaley for an all out showdown for governor in the upcoming November general election, an election in which Ohio's U.S. Senate race is also being closely watched nationwide.

Also at issue, among statewide, congressional and other offices on the ballot this November, is the fight to replace retiring Ohio Supreme Court Chief Justice Maureen O'Connor, a Republican and the first woman elected to the high court post in Ohio, a majority Republican and largely female court of seven justices, three of them Democrats.


CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE FOR WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S JUNE 11, 2022 NOON CITY HALL STEPS RALLY & MARCH AGAINST THE U.S. SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V. WADE


CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR WOMEN'S MARCH CLEVELAND'S JUNE 11, 2022 NOON CITY HALL STEPS RALLY & MARCH AGAINST THE U.S. SUPREME COURT OVERTURNING ROE V WADE AT MOBILIZEUS.COM

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor. Coleman is a seasoned Black Cleveland journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years and an experienced investigative and political reporter. She is the most read independent journalist in Ohio per Alexa.com

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 24 May 2022 14:59

Abortion is also about racial justice, experts and advocates say

E-mail Print PDF

If you're going to talk about the intersection of abortion and race, it's probably a good thing to start with the 14th amendment, says Melissa Murray, a legal scholar and law professor at New York University.

It is, after all, the 14th amendment that the Supreme Court interpreted to give women bodily autonomy — the privacy and liberty to make decisions about their own bodies.

But the 14th amendment wasn't in the "original" draft of the U.S. Constitution.

"It was part of this trio of three amendments that were intended to completely reorder the American landscape in the wake of the civil war, and specifically to introduce newly freed African Americans into the body politic," says Murray.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE AT NPR.ORG

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

The U.S. men's and women's soccer teams will be paid equally under a new deal

E-mail Print PDF

Pictured are players on the U.S Women's National Team celebrate their victory in the penalty shootout over the Netherlands in the Women's Quarter Final match of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images

The U.S. Soccer Federation announced Wednesday that it has reached a deal to pay the U.S. Men's National Team and the U.S. Women's National Team equally, eliminating a contentious pay gap that saw female players earning less.

The new collective bargaining agreements will run through 2028 and include the "equalization" of World Cup prize money, the organization announced. CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE AT NPR.ORG

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Thursday, 19 May 2022 04:03

Louisville, Kentucky's Charles Booker, who is Black, wins the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate and will face incumbent U.S. Senator Rand Paul, a Kentucky Republican, for the November general election

E-mail Print PDF
Pictured are U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky (wearing blue suit), who won the Republican nomination for the U.S. Senate on Tues, May 17, and former state representative Charles Booker (weaing tan suit), a Black Louisville Democrat, won the Democratic nomination. The two will square off in November for the midterm elections


LOUISVILLE, Kentucky-U.S. Sen Rand Paul will face  former state Rep. Charles Booker of Louisville in the general election after initial results showed Paul, the Republican incumbent, and Booker, who is a Black Democrat, both  defeating little-known challengers during Kentucky’s primary elections on Tuesday.

The Associated press called the race early on Tuesday, Kentucky's U.S. Senate primary race one of several being closely watched across the country.

Booker, 38, who rose to prominence as a community advocate during the Breonna Taylor protests, won against three obscure candidates, and Paul, 59, making his third six-year term, won over five low profile opponents,

A former state representative who succeeded Darryl Owens into office and the first Black Democratic candidate to be nominated for statewide election in Kentucky history, Booker is making his second run for the U.S. Senate after running in 2020 and losing the Democratic nomination to retired Marine fighter pilot Amy McGrath, who went on to lose the general election to Republican Mitch McConnell.

A son of former three-time presidential candidate and 12-term former U.S. represetative of Texas, Ron Paul, Sen. Rand Paul heads into the November election with an $8.6 million campaign war chest and Booker has some $470,000. Currently the U.S Senate consists of 50 Democrats, 48 Republicans, and two independents with Republicans vying to take control in November of both the U.S House of Representatives, which the Democrats control, and the Senate.

While eyes are on U.S. Senate races on Tuesday in places like Kentucky and North Carolina, Pennsylvania’s U.S. Senate race is considered by many the most closely watched contest being held on May 17. At stake there is the open Senate primary, with Republican Senator Pat Toomey retiring

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL
Last Updated on Wednesday, 18 May 2022 22:40

10 mostly Black people killed in a racially motivated mass shooting at a Buffalo supermarket, CNN reports

E-mail Print PDF

(CNN)-BUFFALO, New York-Ten mostly Black people were killed in a racially motivated mass shooting at a supermarket in Buffalo on Saturday by a suspect in tactical gear who was livestreaming the attack, law enforcement officials said during a news conference.

The shooting occurred Saturday afternoon at a Tops Friendly Markets store. The suspect in the shooting, a White male, is in custody, police said. He was identified as Payton Gendron, 18, and pleaded not guilty to the first degree murder charge brought against him in court Saturday night, Buffalo City Court Chief Judge Craig Hannah tells CNN.CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE AT CNN.COM
Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com , the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 17 May 2022 22:19

Planned Parenthhood's May 14 Northeast Ohio 'Bans Off Our Bodies' march in Cleveland draws only hundreds after outside organizers snub local Black Women's March organizers, and nationally the event failed to draw mass crowds in big cities

E-mail Print PDF

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.comTel (216) 659-0473 Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com

CLEVELAND, Ohio. After snubbing local Women's March organizers, Planned Parenthood's "Bans Off Our Bodies" marches in Northeast Ohio in Cleveland and elsewhere nationally failed to garner the mass crowd that was expected on Saturday in spite of the corporate-funded group spending thousands upon thousands of dollars for Facebook and other ads for the national initiative. And while a few media outlets covered the event, organizers of Cleveland's rally and march, who did not reside in Cleveland and were from Columbus and Akron, Ohio, got absolutely no pre coverage of the event from Cleveland's mainstream media. (Editor's note: Women's March Cleveland will rally and march Sat. June 11 at noon on the steps of Cleveland City Hall before the U.S. Supreme Court issues its decision in a Mississippi case where the court is set to overturn Roe v. Wade and more than a thousand have already responded on Facebook for the event. Click here to register on Facebook for the open-to-the-public event in June. Click here to register for the event at mobilize us). The event contact tel is (216) 659-0473.

In Cleveland, for instance, which was dubbed the Northeast Ohio regional Bans Off Our Bodies, only hundreds came out to Willard Park in downtown Cleveland, according to the Cleveland Plain Dealer Newspaper, Ohio's largest newspaper. Also, Blacks and elected officials in the majority Black major American city of some 372,000 people stayed away in droves. Organizers had predicted that thousands would turnout, like they did on Oct 2, 2021 for Women's March Cleveland's mass reproductive march, but to no avail.

"They failed to engage the media and the community and were largely ineffective in Cleveland and elsewhere because they are inexperienced organizers who snubbed and disrespected  local women's march organizers in the respective cities, including in Cincinnati, Columbus, Dayton and Cleveland," said Women's March Cleveland head organizer Kathy Wray Coleman. She went on to say that "the event in Cleveland lacked diversity and Black people, and the inexperienced organizers of Planned Parenthood actually cursed out local women's march organizers in Cleveland."

The absence primarily of local leaders in a largely Black city also puzzled Coleman, a seasoned Black community organizer who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years as a reporter, a historical Black print weekly published in Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati. Also, she said, there is a gubernatorial and a U.S. Senate race in Ohio, and congressional and other races, and none of the candidates spoke as the November midterm elections loom. That too, said Coleman, is a reflection on the organizers.

A former Cleveland schools high school biology teacher and longtime community activist and local reporter who also leads the Imperial Women Coalition and International Women's Day March Cleveland, Coleman is Black and has been a head organizer of Women's March Cleveland's mass rallies since 2018 when some 6,000 people turned out, up from 2,500 people on Market Square on Oct 2, 2021 who participated in a reproductive rights rally and march that included Black speakers, local community activists, and a diverse group of area elected officials.

The other reason they were ineffective, said Coleman, is that  unlike Women's March Cleveland, which includes a coalition of local organizations at each major rally and march, Planned Parenthood is corporate funded and is run primarily by  Washington insiders with no ties to the community, let alone the Black community.  She said that "they thought they could buy successful mass marches in Cleveland and nationwide while simultaneously excluding experienced Black local organizers, and they could not."

Coleman called Saturday's rally  and march of mainly out-of-towners in Cleveland by Planned Parenthood's disgruntled outside organizers "divisive and mediocre at best."

Moreover, the local Cleveland activist and organizer said that Women's March National and Planned Parenthood were both unprepared when the leak came down in early May that the U.S. Supreme Court is set to overturn Roe v Wade this summer.

Women's March Cleveland, she, said, which has ties to the national group but remains independent locally since divisive conflict in 2019 between Women's March National and the Jewish community, will be prepared to rally and march and is organizing now with a noon march on June 11 on the steps of Cleveland City Hall before the Supreme Court issues its decision to overturn Roe v Wade, likely in late June.The rally and march will also address Civil and voting rights since Clevelabd is a largely Black city.

Roe v Wade is the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case that made abortion legal nationwide. When it is overturned this summer by the Supreme Court the states will then have authority to regulate or dismantle abortions, and most of the nation's state legislatures are predominantlty Republican like in Texas where abortion after six weeks of pregnancy has been unlawful since September of last year, per a new state law.

 

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Monday, 23 May 2022 17:58

Ads

harry jacob.jpg - 2.82 Kb

The annual11th Congressional District Caucus Parade is Monday, September 2

11th Congressional District Congresswoman Marcia L. Fudge, a Warrensville Heights Democrat who also chairs the Congressional Black Caucus of Blacks in Congress. waives to the crowd last year at the annual 11th Congressional District Caucus Parade.  This year's parade kicks off on Monday, September 2 on Cleveland's east side at 10:00 am from E. 149th Street and Kinsman Road and ends at Luke Easter Park where the picnic will begin. The event will be replete with political speeches and entertainment from various sources, including local musicians and bands. The well-attended caucus parade was initiated by Democrat Louis Stokes, the retired congressman before Fudge, and the tradition was furthered by the late Democratic Congresswoman Stephanie Tubbs Jones, Fudges' predecessor. Stokes was the first Black congressperson from Ohio and Tubbs Jones was the first Black congresswoman from Ohio