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Remembering the "137 shots" Cleveland police killing of two unarmed Blacks as Akron deals with the Jayland Parker "60 shots" Akron police killing.....By Cleveland activist Kathy Wray Coleman, a key organizer of nearly all of the "137 shots" anniversaries

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Pictured are "137 shots" unarmed Cleveland police fatal shooting victim Malissa Williams and Timothy Russell

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com

CLEVELAND, Ohio- The "137 shots" Cleveland police shooting deaths of unarmed Blacks Malissa Williams and Timothy Russell, which occurred the deadly night of Nov. 29, 2012  when Cleveland police chased the duo via the car Williams was driving from downtown Cleveland to neighboring East Cleveland and gunned them down execution style, still haunts the two largely Black cities.

And the recent shooting by eight Akron, Ohio cops of unarmed Jayland Parker, 25, whom they gunned down with 60 bullets earlier this month, is a reminder of what Blacks routinely face when confronted by trigger-happy cops, regardless of the city, cops who are hellbent on gunning down unarmed Black people.

Community activists and other community members generally protest annually at Heritage Middle School on Nov 29, the anniversary date of the "137 shots," the last anniversary held on Nov 29, 2021 in the parking lot of Heritage Middle School in East Cleveland where the killings occurred and hosted by community activists and led by Cleveland activist Kathy Wray Coleman, who leads UImperial Women Coalition and Women's March Cleveland.

Nov 29, 2021  marked the nine-year anniversary of the tragic killings by Cleveland police of Williams and Russell, an event that is commonly known as "137 shots" for the number of shots Cleveland police took in unceremoniously gunning down the unarmed Black couple that was not not wanted by the law.

Speakers at the last anniversary rally included residents of Cleveland and East Cleveland, community activists, Black elected officials, and family members of Black people erroneously gunned down by Cleveland and greater Cleveland cops and other area law enforcement types, like, for example, Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority police officers who recklessly shoot and kill young Black men. Also speaking was Scott Hawkins, who is the father of Arthur Keith, whom a CMHA police officer gunned down, as well as Issue 24 activists such as Alicia Kirkma, whose son was shot and killed by Cleveland police. Criminal justice reform activists, and women's rights and Black Lives Matter activists soke too, as did Cleveland Ward 9 Councilman Kevin Conwell, East Cleveland Councilman Ernest Smith and East Cleveland School Board Member Dr Mary Rice and Dr Beneday Brooks, among others.

Black on Black Crime President Alfred Porter Jr, an annual co-organizer of the event along with Coleman and seasoned activist Art McKoy, say excessive force cases in the  community, whether its East Cleveland, an impoverished Black Cleveland suburb, or Cleveland itself, still merit attention.

Other activists agree with them as to the importance of keeping police reform and excessive force issues before the public during a time of national outcry and growing distrust by Black America in the nation's troubled and intrinsically racist legal system.

"The annual anniversary event is needed to remember the "137 shots" atrocity and to continue our push against excessive force killings by Cleveland police of defenseless Black people and for comprehensive police reforms across the board in Cleveland, neighboring East Cleveland, and elsewhere in Cuyahoga County,"  said  Coleman.

Coleman has been a key "137 shots" anniversary organizer since 2013 and she says that activists will continue to call for police reforms and changes in the legal system, including "changes under state law and the Rules of Criminal Procedure in Ohio as to a grand jury and indictment process that favors police and the wealthy, and disenfranchises Black people,  poor people, among others."

The  last anniversary rally, held in November of 2021, also came on the heels of passage of Issue 24, a Cleveland police reform initiative overwhelmingly approved by voters in 2022 that changes the city's office of professional standards and established a citizen-dominated community review commission that has public policy making authority.  Also at the rally and vigil, activists discussed outgoing Cleveland mayor Frank Jackson's no chase police, which among other mandates, precludes Cleveland police car chases of people absent a suspected felony, a mandate Jackson put in place following several reckless police chases and after Williams and Russell were chased by police by car from downtown Cleveland to neighboring East Cleveland and gunned down execution -style. A former four-term Black mayor and Cleveland's Longest serving mayor,  Jackson retired last year,

Newly elected Cleveland Mayor Justin Bibb and newly selected city council president Blaine Griffin have both said publicly that they will support such a no chase policy and activists will hold them to their promises at the rally and vigil, organizers for Monday's anniversary gathering have said.

Community activists say they will never forget the night nearly 10 years ago when Cleveland police chased Williams and Russell from Cleveland to East Cleveland and gunned them down with 137 bullets in a  car in the Heritage Middle School parking lot.

On that deadly November 29th night a White Cleveland cop, according to public records, claims he mistook Russell's 1979 Chevy Malibu Classic backfiring near the Justice Center in downtown Cleveland and began pursuit of the homeless couple, also radioing the dispatch to call for backup, which came in droves, precautionary measures be damned.

Some 276 patrol officers were working the night of the high speed 22 min. chase that ended in the Heritage Middle School parking lot in neighboring  and impoverished East Cleveland, a Cleveland suburb, Williams and Russell chased by some 64 patrol cars, and literally fleeing for their lives.

The city of Cleveland later settled a wrongful death lawsuit for $3 million that was split between the families of the two victims, Russell leaving behind a grown disabled son. Williams' parents have both since died.

Of the 13 Cleveland officers that fired the combined 137 shots at Russell and Williams, 12 White and one Hispanic, six were fired, including Michael Brelo, who jumped on the hood of Russell's car and shot 49 times through the front windshield, both Russell and Williams dying at the scene

Five of the six officers fired for their roles in the shooting had their jobs reinstated in 2017 by an arbitrator and are Michael Farley, Erin O'Donnell, Christopher Ereg, Wilfredo Diaz, and Brian Sabolik.

The  sixth officer, officer Brelo, was not reinstated after he was fired following his acquittal in May of 2015 on two counts of voluntary manslaughter in a bench trial before Democratic Cuyahoga County Court of Common Pleas Judge John O'Donnell, an acquittal that brought about community protests and some 71 arrests, mainly for minor infractions with police, though a few protesters faced felony charges.

Activists and some Black leaders, led by some Black members of 17-member Cleveland City Council such as Ward 9 Councilman Kevin Conwell, all of them Democrats like O'Donnell, later blocked the common pleas judge as to his 2016 bid for a seat on the Ohio Supreme Court, a race he lost by less than 24,000 votes.

A bid last year by the judge for a Supreme Court seat met the same opposition, O'Donnell, in turn, losing to incumbent Justice Sharon Kennedy, a Republican.

Cleveland police supervisors Patricia Coleman and Randolph Dailey, Michael Donegan, Jason Edens and Paul Wilson all initially faced  misdemeanor dereliction of duty charges regarding their roles in the celebrated shooting.

 

But charges were dismissed against Edens, Wilson and Donegan, and  Sgt. Coleman subsequently won an acquittal by an East Cleveland jury.

Sgt. Dailey's case never got duly prosecuted after Coleman won her case.

Former county prosecutor Tim McGinty, criticized for scheming and preventing felony indictments against the cops at issue, and also protecting the rookie cop that, in 2014, shot and killed 12-year-old Tamir Rice, was voted out of office in 2016 in favor of fellow Democrat and current county prosecutor Mike O'Malley.

The celebrated 137 shots shooting fiasco is the impetus for a  court-monitored consent decree for police reforms with the city of Cleveland and the U.S. Department of Justice, it along with so many other excessive force police killings in Cleveland of unarmed Blacks including 12-year-old Tamir Rice, Brandon Jones, rapper Kenneth Smith, and Tanisha Anderson.

Other than Anderson 38, whom police slammed to the concrete and killed at the family home on Cleveland's east side in November 2014, the year Tamir was shot and killed, all were killed by gun fire from anxious cops.

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com the most read Black digital newspaper and blog in Ohio and in the Midwest Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 19 July 2022 18:16

Activists arrested: Led by Women's March National, thousands rally outside of the White House for support from Biden on abortion access with some arrested, the rally held three days after the president speaks in Cleveland

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Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com

WASHINGTON, D.C.-In the aftermath of the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade last month, Women’s March National led thousands of pro-choice marchers via a rally in front of the White House in Washington, D.C., on Sat July 9, 2022, the continual rain not detering them. (Editor's note: Roe v Wade is the 1973 landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that made abortion legal nationwide)

Protesters gathered at Franklin Square just blocks away from the White House and after listening  to speeches eventually converged in front of the White House to send a message to President Joe Biden who, on Friday, issued an executive order aimed at curtailing the devastating impact of the Supreme Court's Roe v Wade decision. While there the protesters did a sit-in and dozens were arrested after refusing to disperse per police orders.

The president's executive order includes instructions to the Justice Department to make sure women can travel out-of-state for abortion care,  addresses the elevated risks for patients, providers and clinics,  and directs Attorney General Merrick Garland and the White House counsel to convene volunteer lawyers and organizations According to the president, it is designed to "encourage robust legal representation of patients, providers, and third parties lawfully seeking or offering reproductive health care services throughout the country."

Biden’s controversial executive order also says that the federal government will provide leave for federal workers traveling for medical care,

Saturday's White House rally comes just three days after the president visited Cleveland for a speech on the economy and was met with protesters, led by Women's March Cleveland and its head organizer Kathy Wray Coleman, who demanded that he address the fallout from Roe v Wade as well as heigntnened gun violence against women and others, Black people in particular.

While the U.S. Supreme Court reversed Roe v Wade in a Jackson Mississippi case dubbed Jackson vs Mississippi Health Organization as to a state law that bans abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, it also noted that state legislatures across the country would have authority to regulate and readily outlaw abortion in respective states.

Ten states have outlawed abortion, eight have pending abortion bans set to take effect sometime this year, and four, including Ohio, Tennessee, and Florida, have abortion restrictions.

The inaugural Women's March was a nationwide  protest held on Jan 21, 2017, the day after the inauguration of then president Donald Trump. It was spearheaded by Women's March on Washington and prompted in part by statements Trump made during and after his campaign for president against then Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. It was the largest single-day protest in U.S. history with nearly five million women and their supporters marching in sister marches in major and other cities nationwide. In Cleveland that year some 15,000 women and their supporters protested.

A goal of many of the marches is to advocate for legislation and policies regarding human rights and other issues, including women's rights, educational equity, reproductive rights, environmental justice, LGBTQ rights, racial inequality, poverty, freedom of religion, workers' rights, equal pay and police and criminal justice reform.

Now led by executive director Rachael O'Leary Carmona, Women's March National, a non profit organization for women's rights, is governed by a 16-member board of directors.

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor. Coleman is a seasoned Black Cleveland journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years and an experienced investigative and political reporter. She is the most read independent journalist in Ohio per Alexa.com

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL

 

 

Last Updated on Monday, 11 July 2022 05:15

President Biden visits Cleveland as Women's March Cleveland rallies for reproductive rights and against gun violence at the event and was covered by 19 News.....Activists Kathy Wray Coleman and Alysa Cooper of Women's March Cleveland comment

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Published: Jul. 6, 2022 at 6:30 PM EDT, Cleveland 19 News (WOIO)

CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) -Tons of  protesters stood outside of Max Hayes High School.

They were hoping to get the attention of President Biden on his way inside to speak about the economy.

Most of the protesters were there asking Biden to do something pertaining to reproductive rights,and the overturning of Roe V. and the overturning of Roe v Wade.

“It’s my body its my choice, I don’t understand why people are trying to take that right away from us,” said Alysa Cooper. “It’s very important, if we don’t have rights to our own body what do we have rights to?”

But not all protesters shared her cry, one man held signs fighting for the legalization of marijuana, while another held a sign asking why the U.S. was sending so much money helping the fight in Ukraine.

One woman chanted for reproductive rights, but also charged President Biden to speak about issues pertaining to Cleveland specifically.

“The black community wants to hear from him on gun violence, black people are being killed in a disproportional fashion and black women are being raped and murdered,” said Kathy Wray Coleman, head organizer of Women's March Cleveland. “Our constitutional rights are being compromised, and the only issue is the economy”.

Protesters stayed outside of the high school until President Biden arrived.

CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE 19 ACTION NEWS WEBSITE FOR THIS STORY AND VIDEO

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL


Last Updated on Saturday, 09 July 2022 18:38

Led by organizer Kathy Wray Coleman, Women's March Cleveland rallies hundreds at the Cuyahoga County Council meeting with County Executive Armond Budish pledging his support....By Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com

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Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com

CLEVELAND, Ohio- Following a weekend of protests, including a July 4 protest at Public Square on downtown Cleveland, Ohio, hundreds of women and their supporters, led by Women's March Cleveland and its head organizer, Kathy Wray Coleman, rallied outside of the Cuyahoga County Administration Building in downtown Cleveland on Tues, July 5.


After several of the protesters spoke at the county council meeting, the group marched through the city streets, eventually stopping on the steps of Cleveland City Hall before returning to the county administration building.


Tuesday's event was a continuation of  rallies hosted by Women's March Cleveland since Fri, June 24 when the U.S. Supreme Court issued its decision overturning Roe v Wade, the landmark 1973 decision that made abortion legal nationwide. Activists rallied last week in front of the county administration building but the regular meeting was abruptly canceled so they vowed to return on Tuesday and did so in strong force surrounded by a heavy police presence.

Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish joined the protesters and the media outside before the 5pm county council meeting began and pledged his support. His support follows that of Cleveland Mayor Justin Bibb and County Prosecutor Mike O'Malley, who promised not to prosecute women over the heartbeat bill, a state law that took effect in Ohio after Roe v Wade was overturned and that makes abortion after six-weeks of pregnancy illegal in the state.


Budish called the overturning of Roe v Wade "scary" and told the protesters and the media that he would be introducing a proposal to county council in coming weeks that will include the following points


  • Benefits to county employees allowing them access to reproductive health care services, including abortion care. This benefit would assist with transportation, lodging, and related costs. The County would provide this benefit with the utmost focus on protecting the privacy of employees.
  • Financial grants to local and state organizations providing similar health care services to residents, allowing them to access services as needed.
  • Financial grants to support local organizations that provide education regarding reproductive health care options, which include abortion care. These organizations may need additional support to supply these vital education services due to a potential increase in demand.
  • Reproductive health initiatives, including a nondiscrimination ordinance that prohibits discrimination, termination, or other loss of public accommodation because of a reproductive health decision.

Activists said that the public officials who represent them on city and county council should aggressively take on Gov. Mike DeWine, a Republican seeking reelection who has vowed to do everything in his power to outlaw abortion in Ohio.


Among other slogans, the marchers chanted "hey hey ho ho Mike DeWine has got to go" on the steps of City Hall. Alysa Cooper, a Cleveland activist, joined Coleman, a seasoned organizer, in leading the crowd of protesters.


While the U.S. Supreme Court reversed Roe v Wade in a Jackson Mississippi case dubbed Jackson vs Mississippi Health Organization as to a state law that bans abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, it also noted that state legislatures across the country would have authority to regulate and readily outlaw abortion in respective states.

 

 

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL

Last Updated on Sunday, 31 July 2022 07:41

President Joe Biden to speak in Cleveland on July 6, 2022.... By editor Kathy Wray Coleman of Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's Black digital news leader

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Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher,editor-in-cheif

WASHINGTON, D. C. - President Joe Biden will speak ay Max Hayes High Schhol on Cleveland's west side on Wed. July 6, 2022 to deliver remarks on his economic agenda and his strategy of “building the economy from the bottom up and the middle out,” the White House said in a press release on Friday.

It is the president's sixth visit to Ohio since taking office. More details about the trip will be released in upcoming days. The president's last visit to Cleveland was last May at Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C) where he discussed the economy.

His upcoming visit comes as America's economy is in a dither due to a still existing pandemic and during upheaval following the U.S. Supreme Court's June 24 decision overturning Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 decision that made abortion legal nationwide, that decsison, per such court ruling, now left up to the respective state legislatures that craft state laws.

In office since 2021 after he defeated then president Donald Trump in a heated election in 2020, Biden, a Democrat, is a former vice president under former president Barack Obama, the nation's first Black president.

By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor. Coleman is a seasoned Black Cleveland journalist who trained at the Call and Post Newspaper for 17 years and an experienced investigative and political reporter. She is the most read independent journalist in Ohio per Alexa.com

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.


Last Updated on Wednesday, 06 July 2022 11:27

Ketanji Brown Jackson sworn in as the U.S. Supreme Court's first Black female justice....By Kathy Wray Coleman of Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's Black digital news leader

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By Kathy Wray Coleman, associate publisher, editor

WASHINGTON, D.C.- U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson, a former U.S. District Court judge out of Washington, D.C. and the first Black woman to be confirmed for a seat on the nation's  highest court was sworn-in at noon on Thurs., June 30

Flanked by her husband, Dr. Patrick Jackson, a heart surgeon,  Justice Brown Jackson was sworn in by Chief Justice John Roberts.


President Joe Biden tapped Brown Jackson as his Supreme Court pick earlier this year, the justice ultimately confirmed 53-47 by the U.S. Senate.


Justice Brown Jackson is the court's  third Black justice, behind the late Thurgood Marshall, the court's first Black justice and a Civil Rights icon, and Clarence Thomas, a current member of the court and a conservative justice who routinely votes against Blacks and women relative to public policy issues that come before the court.

Her confirmation is, in no uncertain terms, unprecedented in American history, and her swearing in comes  just days after the court overturned Roe v Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision that made abortion legal nationwide.

Vice President Kamala Harris, the nation's first Black and first woman vice president, presided over the Senate confirmation vote as three Senate Republicans, senators Susan Murkowski, Susan Collins and Mitt Romney, broke ranks to join all 50 Democrats in supporting her nomination. The judge and President Biden watched the Senate vote come in from the White House and after Republicans cleared Senate chambers after the vote count was announced Democratic senators gave Jackson a standing ovation.

Flanked by the president and vice president, Brown Jackson said during her speech at the White House after her confirmation that "we've made it, all of us," a likely reference to Black women in America. And she said that "I am the dream and the hope of a slave."

The retiring U.S. Sen Rob Portman, a Cincinnati Republican, voted against her nomination,  while Ohio's other U.S. senator, Sherrod Brown, a popular JFK-type Cleveland Democrat, supported her, Sen Brown saying in a statement that Justice Jackson is supremely qualified and that her confirmation is historic.

“This is a historic day in our nation’s history, and I was proud to be able to vote to confirm Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson," said Sen. Brown when Brown Jackson was confirmed earlier this year "Justice Jackson’s diverse set of experiences and perspectives have long been lacking from our nation’s highest court. These experiences make her an ideal justice.”

On the district court bench in D.C. from 2013 -2021 and until she became a federal appeals court judge last year, Justice Brown Jackson replaced retired Justice Stephen Bryer, whom she once clerked for. Her appointment is not expected to tilt the court's 6-3 conservative majority as Bryer, a  Clinton appointee,  is considered a moderate liberal by most standards.

A Harvard educated judge and Black legal scholar, Justice Brown Jackson will join Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, both President Obama appointees, as the three who make up the liberal wing of the court.

The court's 116th justice, she also joins Kagan, Sotomayer and conservative justice Amy Coney Barrett as one of four women currently on the court, and she is the sixth woman to join the court since its first assembly in 1790, the othertwo of whom were Sandra Day O'Connor and the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Also of significance is that she joins the court as the midterm elections near and as the court prepares to hear high profile cases on the death penalty, criminal procedure, and the first amendment, and after its controversial Roe v Wadedecision of June 24, 2022,

During confirmation hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee she vowed to be independent and to approach cases from a neutral perspective. She also rejected frivolous GOP attacks at those hearings on her judicial record as a judge who was soft on crime as "nothing  further from the truth." And she told Senate Judiciary Committee members, both Democrats and Republicans alike, that her impartial record as a judge over the last decade speaks for itself.

“I have been a judge for nearly a decade now, and I take that responsibility and my duty to be independent very seriously,” Brown Jackson said. “I decide cases from a neutral posture. I evaluate the facts, and I interpret and apply the law to the facts of the case before me, without fear or favor, consistent with my judicial oath.”

When U.S. Sen Cory Booker of New Jersey used his turn at Senate confirmation hearings to introduce a litany of reasons why she is qualified, and then spoke at length on the significance of her nomination and her pathway to becoming a Supreme Court nominee, the judge broke into tears.

President Biden,  a former U.S. senator who was vice president under Barack Obama, the country's first Black president and a former U.S. senator himself, ousted incumbent Republican president Donald Trump to take the White House in 2020. Thereafter, he  fulfilled his campaign promise of nominating a Black woman for the U.S. Supreme Court when he did so earlier this year.  At the time, the president, a staunch Democrat, called Brown Jackson one of the nation’s brightest legal minds  and said that she has "a deep understanding of the Constitution as an enduring charter of liberty, much like Breyer."

Born in Washington, D.C. and raised in Florida, Jackson attended Harvard University both for undergraduate studies and law school, where,like Obama, she served as an editor on the Harvard Law Review.

She began her legal career with three clerk ships, including one with Justice Bryer, whom she would later replace on the nation's highest court. Though President Biden nominated her to the  United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia in 2021 to replace Merrick Garland, now the U.S. attorney general with the Biden administration, it was then president Obama who nominated to her prior judgeship as  a  district judge for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

The Honorable Justice Jackson, 51, has been married to Dr, Patrick G. Jackson  since 1996, and the couple has two grown daughters, Leila and Telia.


Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, the most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog in Ohio and in the Midwest. Tel: (216) 659-0473. Email: editor@clevelandurbannews.com. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

Last Updated on Saturday, 02 July 2022 20:22

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The annual11th Congressional District Caucus Parade is Monday, September 2

11th Congressional District Congresswoman Marcia L. Fudge, a Warrensville Heights Democrat who also chairs the Congressional Black Caucus of Blacks in Congress. waives to the crowd last year at the annual 11th Congressional District Caucus Parade.  This year's parade kicks off on Monday, September 2 on Cleveland's east side at 10:00 am from E. 149th Street and Kinsman Road and ends at Luke Easter Park where the picnic will begin. The event will be replete with political speeches and entertainment from various sources, including local musicians and bands. The well-attended caucus parade was initiated by Democrat Louis Stokes, the retired congressman before Fudge, and the tradition was furthered by the late Democratic Congresswoman Stephanie Tubbs Jones, Fudges' predecessor. Stokes was the first Black congressperson from Ohio and Tubbs Jones was the first Black congresswoman from Ohio