Thousands of Black women march on Washington on September 30, 2017, calling out the names of Black women subjected to heinous violence as well as citing statistics that show that Black women remain at risk in comparison White women

Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog with some 4.5 million views on Google Plus alone.Tel: (216) 659-0473 and Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Kathy Wray Coleman, editor-in-chief, and who trained for 17 years at the Call and Post Newspaper in Cleveland, Ohio. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

By Kathy Wray Coleman, editor-in-chief


CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM-WASHINGTON, D.C.-Thousands of Black

women and their supporters marched on Washington, D.C. on Saturday,  a march led by Black women and sponsored by the Black Women’s Blueprint, Black Youth Project 100 and Trans Sisters of Color Project.


Black female victims of violence, punctuated by a chant of “Say her name!” were cited as women linked arms in solidarity.


President Donald Trump did not escape scrutiny, the Black women saying that Trump's policies are disenfranchising Black women and the Black community, and erasing decades of Civil Rights gains.


A separate rally dubbed a March for Racial Justice was also held that morning, the two groups then marching in solidarity to Lincoln Park on Capitol Hill, and then to the Justice Department and to the National Mall.


More than 20 related marches for racial justice were scheduled to take place around the country, the Black women's march held separately because their leaders said issues impacting Black women must be addressed, and in an independent manner.

“It’s difficult getting the issues specific to black women and girls centered within the racial justice movement of this nation,” Farah Tanis, the co-founder and co-executive director of the Black Women’s Blueprint, told The Root.


“Also, 50 to 60 percent of black girls are sexually assaulted, but people have a hard time believing this even though they know historically, we have endured rape and have been enforced to endure generations of rape,” she continued. “Black kids are born to poor black mothers. How do you not see that as a racial-justice issue?”


More than 77,000 Black women and girls are missing in the United States, data show.


And statistics are alarming in practically every arena that reveal that Black women and girls remain at risk in comparison to White women and girls, from mass incarceration to education, job inequality, malicious prosecution, police brutality, healthcare, murder, rape, and other heinous crimes of violence. And the list goes on.


Clevelandurbannews.com and Kathywraycolemanonlinenewsblog.com, Ohio's most read Black digital newspaper and Black blog with some 4.5 million views on Google Plus alone.Tel: (216) 659-0473 and Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Kathy Wray Coleman, editor-in-chief, and who trained for 17 years at the Call and Post Newspaper in Cleveland, Ohio. We interviewed former president Barack Obama one-on-one when he was campaigning for president. As to the Obama interview, CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT CLEVELAND URBAN NEWS.COM, OHIO'S LEADER IN BLACK DIGITAL NEWS.

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 04 October 2017 04:44